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London police arrest teen hacking suspect but won’t confirm GTA 6, Uber links

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Police didn’t identify the suspect, but many personal details mirror information uncovered during arrests this spring targeting members of the Lapsus$ hacking group

Art rendering of transparent laptop in front of a wall of surveilling eyes.

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

The City of London police report they’ve arrested a 17-year-old in Oxfordshire on suspicion of hacking and said he remains in custody, without releasing any other details.

Police declined to say what incident the arrest was in connection with, but many of the details line up with recent high-profile hacks. This spring, the City of London police arrested and released seven teenagers in connection with an investigation into the Lapsus$ hacking group. Today’s arrest also comes just days after two security breaches believed to be connected to Lapsus$, with the leak of early Grand Theft Auto 6 footage due to a “network intrusion” and a security breach at Uber that caused it to take several internal systems offline for a while.

In March, Bloomberg reported that a person believed to be behind several of the group’s major attacks was a then-16-year-old whose home the police visited near Oxford, England, which is in the county of Oxfordshire.

In a statement after the Uber breach, the company wrote on its blog, “We believe that this attacker (or attackers) are affiliated with a hacking group called Lapsus$, which has been increasingly active over the last year or so.” The GTA 6 leaker claimed in forum posts to be the same person responsible for the attack on Uber.

City of London police declined to share additional details with The Verge.

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The model seems rudimentary (the renders aren’t amazing quality and seem limited in their variety), but generative AI models like this are only going to improve, speeding up work for all sorts of creative types.


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Japan will fully reopen to tourists in October following two and a half years of travel restrictions.

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Good news for folks who have been waiting to book their dream Tokyo vacation: Japan will finally relax Covid border control measures for visa-free travel and individual travelers on October 11th.

Tourists will still need to be vaccinated three times or submit a negative COVID-19 test result ahead of their trip, but can take advantage of the weak yen and a ‘national travel discount’ launching on the same date. Sugoi!


Sony starts selling the Xperia 1 IV with continuous zoom lens.

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Here’s Allison’s take on Sony’s continuous-zoom lens when she tested a prototype Xperia 1 IV back in May: 

Sony put a good point-and-shoot zoom in a smartphone. That’s an impressive feat. In practical use, it’s a bit less impressive. It’s essentially two lenses that serve the same function: portrait photography. The fact that there’s optical zoom connecting them doesn’t make them much more versatile.

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If God sees everything, so do these apps.

Some Churches are asking congregants to install so-called “accountability apps” to prevent sinful behavior. A Wired investigation found that they monitor almost everything a user does on their phone, including taking regular screenshots and flagging LGBT search terms.


Shutterstock punts on AI-generated content.

Earlier this week, Getty Images banned the sale of AI-generated content, citing legal concerns about copyright. Now, its biggest rival, Shutterstock, has responded by doing … absolutely nothing. In a blog post, Shutterstock’s CEO Paul Hennessy says there are “open questions on the copyright, licensing, rights, and ownership of synthetic content and AI-generated art,” but doesn’t announce any policy changes. So, you can keep on selling AI art on Shutterstock, I guess.


This custom Super73 makes me want to tongue-kiss an eagle.

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The sincerest form of flattery.

I had little interest in Apple’s Dynamic Island, but once a developer built their spin on the idea for Android, I had to give it a try.

Surprisingly, I’ve found I actually like it, and while dynamicSpot isn’t as well-integrated as Apple’s version, it makes up for it with customization. Nilay’s iPhone 14 Pro review asked Apple to reverse the long-press to expand vs. tap to enter an app setup. In dynamicSpot, you can do that with a toggle (if you pay $5).


DynamicSpot app on Android shown expanding music player, in the style of Apple’s Dynamic Island in iOS 16.

DynamicSpot in action on a Google Pixel 6

Image: Richard Lawler

The Twitter employee who testified about Trump and the January 6th attack has come forward.

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And now it’s coming for TikTok.


The latest Alex Jones defamation hearing is not going well for Alex Jones.

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